Logo

Organic / Slow food restaurants

Organic restaurants offer mainly or exclusively food and drinks in organic quality. In most cases they also set value on regionality and seasonality. In addition, there are gastronomic establishments where individual dishes or components are offered in organic quality.

However, the designation as “Slow Food -  restaurant” cannot be done by the establishments themselves. Instead, the NGO Slow Food labels restaurants which follow the slow food criteria of good, clean and fair food: hand-made dishes from regional and seasonal ingredients without flavor enhancers, artificial flavors and convenience products.

Moreover, there are single restaurants that committed themselves to further sustainability goals, as for example the Association >Restlos glücklich< in Berlin that uses food which would otherwise be discarded.

Aim and innovation

The objective is to achieve sustainability in gastronomy. Organic restaurants primarily support organic farming by increasing demand and offer their customers high-quality food. By focusing on hand-crafted production the Slow Food guide supports smaller businesses in agriculture and gastronomy as well as sustainable production methods apart from organic certification. Organic certification and Slow Food labelling provide guidance and  transparency for customers.

 

Examples

Country Inn ›Auf dem Brink‹ (Sprockhövel near Wuppertal), Stappen (Düsseldorf-Oberkassel), Natural’Mente (Berlin), Resihuber (Munich)

Category

consumption (infrastructure)

Actors

restaurant managers, customers, Slow Food members, Slow Food Germany

Development and current dynamics

In 2010 there were 1850 kitchens with an organic certification, in 2014 there were already 2500. In addition to that, it is estimated that at least twice as many kitchens offer organic dishes without certification. Hence, the niche is clearly growing. Currently, according to the Slow Food guide, there are about 400 restaurants.

 

Sustainability potential

Ecological

  • biodiversity (indirect)
  • soil (indirect)
  • water (indirect)
  • climate (indirect)
  • resource efficiency in production and consumption (indirect)

Economic

  • promotion of regional economy cycles (indirect)
  • support of actors with positive external effects (indirect)
  • fair producer prices (indirect)
  • transparence along the value-chain

Social

  • awareness/ education on sustainable nutrition
  • animal welfare (indirect)

Risks/ disadvantages

The partly higher prices for dishes which could lead to an exclusion of lower income groups. 

 

Conclusion

Organic restaurants offer mainly or exclusively food and drinks in organic quality. In most cases, they also set value on regionality and seasonality. Slow Food restaurants follow certain criteria of good, clean and fair food. Organic certification and Slow Food labelling provide guidance and  transparency for customers.

The niche is currently growing. Organic and slow food restaurants mainly have indirect positive sustainability effects. The partly higher prices for dishes are less attractive for lower income groups. The sustainability and transformation potential could be increased with innovative concepts (for example through participatory quarter canteens).

 


[1]Land Berlin (2018): Bio-Restaurants in Berlin. Web, 06.06.2018. https://www.berlin.de/special/bio-und-fairtrade-in-berlin/3090779-3089636-biorestaurants-in-berlin.html.

[2]Slow Food Deutschland (2018): Genussführer Convivium Stuttgart. Gasthäuser, getestet und empfohlen vom Convivium Stuttgart. Web, 06.06.2018. www.slowfood.de/slow_food_vor_ort/stuttgart/genussfuehrer.

[3] Schanzenstern Altona (2018): Bio im Schanzenstern Altona. Web, 06.06.2018. https://schanzenstern.com/altona/mittagstisch-catering/schanzenstern-altona.html; ROSE (2018): Bio-Vielfalt seit 1950. Web, 06.06.2018. www.tress-gastronomie.de

[4] Slow Food Deutschland (2017): Slow Food Genussführer. Web, 06.06.2017. https://www.slowfood.de/slow_food_vor_ort/bergisches_land/genussfuehrer/; Slow Food Deutschland (2018)

[5] a’verdis (Hrsg.) (2017): Mit einfachen Schritten zur Bio-Zertifizierung. Der Leitfaden für Gemeinschaftsverpflegung und Gastronomie. Münster: a’verdis, S. 4. Web, 06.06.2018. www.gfrs.de/fileadmin/files/biozertifizierung-gastronomie.pdf